Friday, 22 February 2013

Reader Recipe: Hot, Hearty Golden Puff

Can we be frank(furter) here for a minute? Every time I buy Velveeta, my heart gets ripped apart. Not because of the taste, but because of the cost. It’s eight cock-a-doodle dollars! Why is non-cheese eight dollars?!?

Anyways, here’s a recipe that Caker Cooking reader, Bob, sent in a while back that, until recently, I never had the money time to make. Can I remind you how much cakers love their saltine crackers? They're like communion wafers for us. Why, we even created Tupperware containers to house them.

While Hot, Hearty, Golden Puff (I prefer to call it "Cracker Casserole") may seem off-putting, essentially you’re looking at a cheese strata. (Only without the real cheese and, well, the strata.) I appreciate the fact that the advertisement below claims it’s “full of nutrition" but if it wasn't for that parsley sprig on top, could they still make that claim?

In any case, I enjoyed it, even if my wallet didn’t. Suffice to say, that's the last time I spend ten dollars on dinner.

Thanks, Bob!

Cover the bottom of a 12” x 8” baking dish with half a “stack pack” of crisp Premium Crackers. Cover the crackers with ¾ lb. of sliced Kraft Velveeta Cheese. Top with 2 tbsp. chopped onions and the remaining crackers. Over this pour a mixture of: 4 beaten eggs, 2 ½ cups milk, ½ tsp. dry mustard, dash of pepper. Set the casserole aside for one hour; then pop it into a 325° oven for 40 minutes. Sprinkle with paprika and serve at once.

Source: Bob via Velveeta

19 comments:

  1. Intriguing recipe! And yes...why IS Velveeta so expensive?? I wonder if it was expensive back in the day when it came out - or did it just get too big for its britches?

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    1. I think, somewhere along the way, cakers started considering Velveeta as "gourmet." It was only a matter of time before Kraft jacked up the price accordingly. Just keep your fingers crossed the same doesn't happen for Tater Tots.

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  2. The recipe variations sound very fancy - I assume that would be like for a wedding or something?

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    1. I have a feeling this recipe - and even the variations - might be too low-brow for the average caker wedding. Having said that, I could easily see this at a highschool graduation party, a christening or a we've-redone-our-rec-room soiree.

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  3. Wow, it looks exactly like the picture in the ad; we all know what a rare occurrence that is. I cannot imagine the amount of sodium in this dish. Velveeta *and* saltines? Whoo.
    Good question about the price of Velveeta. I think it's actually more expensive than genuine cheese, but I guess all that technology doesn't come cheap.
    Glad you liked the recipe, and you know I'm keeping my beady little eyes out for more.

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    1. Thanks, Bob. I don't know where you find these gems, but keep them coming. The man who introduced me to Tang Pah can do no wrong in my caker books.

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  4. I love how the Velveeta is oozing out ever-so-slightly in that one spot. That's money, baby.

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    1. I knew you'd like that Mimi. I'm getting really good with my Kodak disposable camera, aren't I?

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  5. DUH. Velveeta is so expensive because you get the added benefit of unlimited [fridge]shelf-life.

    Also, Brian, I'd like to give you a caker-suggestion that is extra-cakey. My father-in-law and his wife were married in the early 80's. They had a "sandwich cake" at their wedding -- it was a giant sandwich (white bread sliced along the loaf-length) with sandwich-spread fillings and a savory cream cheese "Frosting." It doubled as an entree AND a wedding cake! Sadly, we do not have a picture of this Sandwich Cake but perhaps they were big in Canada?? I'd love to re-create one and I know you are the man for the job!

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    1. Stephanie, let me tell you a story. A few years ago, someone brought a "bridge loaf" to my annual Caker Christmas party. It was exactly as you describe it - a loaf of bread, filled with different spreads and then "iced" with cream cheese. For reasons that remain a mystery to me, this guest tinted the cream cheese green - and put cherry tomatos on top. I suppose it won't come as a surprise to tell you that no one touched it. In fact, people were visibly disturbed by it. Having said that, perhaps it's time for me to revisit this monstrosity in the near future. I'll let you know if I travel down the green cream cheese highway.

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  6. Hmmm, hot, hearty, golden puff you say....it's defintely an interesting recipe.
    I haven't figured out why Velveeta is so expensive either, maybe because it will be the only thing that survives when the world ends?

    Nazneen

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    1. Sadly, if Velveeta outlives us (and it likely will), it'll finally drop in price since no one will be around to buy it.

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  7. One of your UK correspondents here. Velveeta always sounds so GLAMOROUS to me. Does it come in a block or in slices? Fascinating...

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    1. I think you can get both blocks and slices. It also comes in eau de toilette, but that, not surprisingly, is pretty expensive, too.

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    2. If Velveeta is glamorous, I'm a Roman emperor

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  8. Have you tried the dessert version of these? A layer of soda crackers upon which is drizzled melted chocolate, brown sugar & butter? Sheer heaven!!!

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    1. You bet! It was one of the first recipes I featured on the blog. You can't beat it.

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  9. This dish sounds all kinds of divine, but I personally would use real cheddar cheese mixed with laughing cow spreadable cheese wedges. But this sounds tasty indeed.

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    1. If you want to be all fancy-like and use real cheese, you go right ahead. It'd be cheaper than Velveeta. (Yes, I'm still upset by how expensive it is.)

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